MEMBER RESOURCES  

Resource info to help with planning your Rx burn and completing your pre- and post-burn plans.

 

Follow ULPBA Guidelines 

Pre-burn plans:    submit a minimum of 10 business days prior to the   

                              actual burn

Post-burn plans:  submit within 30 days of the completion of each burn

You may also leave your plans with Robin Jetton at her office: 

Surety Title Co., 1802 Main St (Ste C) in Junction.

(If the office is closed, please use the mail slot to leave your plan.)

Map My Property

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The Texas A&M Forest Service provides the Map My Property application for locating and mapping your property; insert your address and map it.

http://texasforestinfo.tamu.edu/mapmyproperty/

GOOGLE EARTH:  if using Google Earth for making maps, you must also use a companion program called GE Path to calculate acreage and display GPS points.

https://www.google.com/earth/

BLANK BURN PLAN TEMPLATES

Members may use any of these templates.

Fillable form blank burn plansclick on a blue link below, save the form, then open to complete it.  Save your work and email or hand-deliver as noted above.

 

Or click on              for pdf version

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Edwards Plateau Prescribed Burning Assoc

Handy Q&A to determine burning conditions 

EPPBA Burn-No Burn Checklist

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Prescribed Burn Alliance of Texas

PBAT Blank Burn Plan (save/fill)

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Texas Parks & Wildlife Dept

TPWD Blank Burn Plan  (save/fill)

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Texas Dept of Agriculture

TDA Blank Burn Plan  (save/fill)

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USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service

NRCS-TX Blank Burn Plan (save/fill)

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WEATHER FORECAST INFO 

Click on the links below

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National Weather Service Forecast

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SPOTFIRES

The 40% Rule 

"If we can narrow spot fire causes down to a single main weather factor, burn bosses might focus on that variable, possibly reducing the chance of spot fires."     John Weir   

PROBABILITY OF SPOT FIRES DURING PRESCRIBED BURNS

By John Weir

READ ARTICLE

MOISTURE CONTENT

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Look up a value for Kimble county using the Wildland Fire Assessment System (WFAS) website for green moisture and dead moisture for 1, 10, 100 and 1000 hr fuels. Huge database with one data station in Kimble County that takes measurements every two weeks.

http://www.wfas.net/

It can still be best to perform your own moisture content analysis, since conditions can vary greatly over the entire county.

How to Determine Moisture Content

Sam Jetton

Pull leaves off a number of junipers.  Leaves should be 3-4 feet off the ground.  I would select from all sides of trees.  It is imperative that no woody material be included in the sample.  Weigh the sample.  Remember to subtract bag weight.  Microwave the sample.  I will usually microwave for 1.5 minutes and then re-weigh the sample.  I then continue to nuke the sample for 30 seconds.  I have also found it helps to mix the sample periodically so the lower leaves are brought up so they can dry more easily.  Always re-weigh when it comes out of the microwave.  Once you get the same weight then you are finished. 

 

The equation to compute green leaf moisture is:

 

Green Weight – Dry weight/Dry Weight X 100

 

You can wind up with over 100% glm with this approach.  You can use the same procedure to determine liveoak leaf moisture and what the moisture content is of the grass.

 
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SPOTFIRES

ULPBA partners with John Weir and his associates at OSU, the Oklahoma Prescribed Burn Association and the Great Plains Fire Science Exchange as they gather and compile data from prescribed burns across several states.  Weir is the superintendent of the Oklahoma State University Research Range and prescribed burning instructor in the Rangeland Ecology and Management program, Plant and Soil Science Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK.   

"If we can narrow spot fire causes down to a single main weather factor, burn bosses might focus on that variable, possibly reducing the chance of spot fires."     John Weir   

PROBABILITY OF SPOT FIRES DURING PRESCRIBED BURNS
By John R. Weir

Published in Fire Management Today


Spot fires have always been a problem on prescribed burns.  Just the possibility of a spot fire can cause mental and physical stress on burn bosses and crews. Actual spot fires can cause personal injury or even loss of life, as well as costly damages and loss of public support for prescribed fire programs.


Many private and public land managers in Oklahoma have told me that they avoid prescribed burning for fear of spot fires and escaped fires. Many have the resources needed to conduct prescribed fires, but lack the experience or knowledge to deal with spot fires. A simple guideline or rule-of-thumb might help.

 

Variables Affecting Fire Behavior
Weather factors are the main variables that burn bosses can use to predict and monitor prescribed fire behavior.  In general, there are three main weather factors:
•  Relative humidity.

Burning when relative humidity exceeds 40 percent significantly slows rates of spread (Lindenmuth and Davis 1973) and reduces danger from firebrands (Green 1977).
•  Temperature.

Bunting and Wright (1974) found that danger from firebrands was lower if the ambient air temperature is below 60 ºF (15 ºC) when burning.
•   Windspeed.

Windspeeds of at least 8 miles (13 km) per hour are needed to ignite and burn standing fuels (Britton and Wright 1971). However, wind-speeds of more than 20 miles (32 km) per hour can create problems with firebrands and other blowing debris (Wright and Bailey 1982).
If we can narrow spot fire causes down to a single main weather factor, burn bosses might focus on that variable, possibly reducing the chance of spot fires.

Key Variable
At the Oklahoma State University Research Range (OSURR), we conduct prescribed burns during different seasons all over Oklahoma. Fuels include tallgrass prairie (NFES fuel models 1 and 3—see Anderson 1982), post oak–blackjack oak (fuel models 3, 8, and 9), eroded mixed prairie (fuel models 1 and 3), sandsage grassland (fuel model 4), and oak–pine (fuel models 3, 8, 9, and 11). Since 1996, we have been keeping track of spot fires on our prescribed burns. We consider a spot fire to be any fire outside the burn unit, no matter what the size or cause.

. . . Read Weir's complete article, which includes the 40 Per Cent Threshold and Spotfire Probability